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Explore the UC Narrative – a global survey to support the UC community

Discover how new insights may help you understand living with ulcerative colitis (UC)

What is the UC Narrative Global Survey?

The UC Narrative is a global initiative created by Pfizer to engage the UC community to help identify how people living with ulcerative colitis are impacted by the disease. This survey was done in collaboration with UC patients, leading experts, and patient organizations.

Ulcerative colitis can be a chronic, debilitating, and often misunderstood condition. That’s why we must work together to turn the insights from this survey into actionable communications that can help better understand patients' needs and challenges. Learn about the survey results below to learn about how UC impacts others' lives around the world.

How UC is understood around the world

In order to start a global conversation about UC, we think it’s important that people living with this disease know that they are not alone in their experiences. Explore the survey data below to see what people and physicians from 10 different countries had to say about UC. Please note that the data is not meant to make comparisons and while the survey results don’t necessarily reflect the experiences of all UC patients – it does show that people living with UC aren’t alone in dealing with the disease.

See results by selecting country below.

From 2017-2018, we surveyed 2,100 ulcerative colitis (UC) patients and 1,271 gastroenterologists (GIs) from different countries to test patients’ knowledge of UC – and physicians’ perceptions about their patients’ knowledge.

flags-australiaflags-canadaflags-finlandflags-franceflags-germanyflags-italyflags-japanflags-spainflags-ukflags-us

Australia Survey Results

In Australia, specifically, we surveyed 215 adults living with UC and 90 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

23%
of adults with UC surveyed in Australia

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

83%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Australia

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

29%
of adults with UC surveyed in Australia

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

66%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Australia

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

34%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Australia

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

23%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Australia

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

67%
of adults with UC surveyed in Australia

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

53%
of UC patients surveyed in Australia

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

60%
of UC patients surveyed in Australia

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

60%
of UC patients surveyed in Australia

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

69%
of UC patients surveyed in Australia

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

84%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Australia

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Canada Survey Results

In Canada, specifically, we surveyed 215 adults living with UC and 80 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

23%
of adults with UC surveyed in Canada

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

68%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Canada

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

30%
of adults with UC surveyed in Canada

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

71%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Canada

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

30%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Canada

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

42%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Canada

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

52%
of adults with UC surveyed in Canada

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

43%
of UC patients surveyed in Canada

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

47%
of UC patients surveyed in Canada

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

44%
of UC patients surveyed in Canada

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

54%
of UC patients surveyed in Canada

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

86%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Canada

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Finland Survey Results

In Finland, specifically, we surveyed 105 adults living with UC and 17 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

25%
of adults with UC surveyed in Finland

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

76%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Finland

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

23%
of adults with UC surveyed in Finland

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

76%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Finland

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

25%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Finland

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

53%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Finland

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

68%
of adults with UC surveyed in Finland

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

50%
of UC patients surveyed in Finland

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

56%
of UC patients surveyed in Finland

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

51%
of UC patients surveyed in Finland

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

70%
of UC patients surveyed in Finland

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

94%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Finland

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

France Survey Results

In France, specifically, we surveyed 169 adults living with UC and 154 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

22%
of adults with UC surveyed in France

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

68%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in France

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

27%
of adults with UC surveyed in France

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

65%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in France

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

33%
of adults living with UC surveyed in France

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

57%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in France

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

72%
of adults with UC surveyed in France

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

47%
of UC patients surveyed in France

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

59%
of UC patients surveyed in France

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

51%
of UC patients surveyed in France

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

73%
of UC patients surveyed in France

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

81%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in France

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Germany Survey Results

In Germany, specifically, we surveyed 210 adults living with UC and 152 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

28%
of adults with UC surveyed in Germany

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

76%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Germany

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

41%
of adults with UC surveyed in Germany

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

71%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Germany

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

29%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Germany

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

55%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Germany

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

68%
of adults with UC surveyed in Germany

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

59%
of UC patients surveyed in Germany

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

54%
of UC patients surveyed in Germany

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

51%
of UC patients surveyed in Germany

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

61%
of UC patients surveyed in Germany

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

83%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Germany

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Italy Survey Results

In Italy, specifically, we surveyed 210 adults living with UC and 157 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

17%
of adults with UC surveyed in Italy

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

77%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Italy

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

33%
of adults with UC surveyed in Italy

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

66%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Italy

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

27%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Italy

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

57%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Italy

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

76%
of adults with UC surveyed in Italy

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

45%
of UC patients surveyed in Italy

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

62%
of UC patients surveyed in Italy

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

43%
of UC patients surveyed in Italy

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

70%
of UC patients surveyed in Italy

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

81%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Italy

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Japan Survey Results

In Japan, specifically, we surveyed 210 adults living with UC and 151 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

22%
of adults with UC surveyed in Japan

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

70%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Japan

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

30%
of adults with UC surveyed in Japan

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

59%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Japan

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

27%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Japan

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

57%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Japan

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

65%
of adults with UC surveyed in Japan

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

52%
of UC patients surveyed in Japan

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

45%
of UC patients surveyed in Japan

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

52%
of UC patients surveyed in Japan

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

57%
of UC patients surveyed in Japan

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

71%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Japan

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Spain Survey Results

In Spain, specifically, we surveyed 214 adults living with UC and 151 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

27%
of adults with UC surveyed in Spain

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

77%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Spain

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

34%
of adults with UC surveyed in Spain

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

85%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Spain

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

28%
of adults living with UC surveyed in Spain

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.*

43%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Spain

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

62%
of adults with UC surveyed in Spain

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

49%
of UC patients surveyed in Spain

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

50%
of UC patients surveyed in Spain

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

50%
of UC patients surveyed in Spain

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

83%
of UC patients surveyed in Spain

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

91%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in Spain

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

United Kingdom (U.K.) Survey Results

In the U.K., specifically, we surveyed 251 adults living with UC and 153 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

18%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.K.

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

59%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.K.

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

31%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.K.

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

61%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.K.

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.

25%
of adults living with UC surveyed in the U.K.

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

53%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.K.

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

62%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.K.

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).*

43%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.K.

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.*

48%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.K.

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.*

41%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.K.

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.*

50%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.K.

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

95%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.K.

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

U.S.A. Survey Results

In the United States, specifically, we surveyed 301 adults living with UC and 149 gastroenterologists. Here are a few of the findings from the survey that show there might be an opportunity to improve education and management of the disease.

19%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.S.

were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

74%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.S.

thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

28%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.S.

were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

67%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.S.

thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.

34%
of adults living with UC surveyed in the U.S.

wished that their gastroenterologist (GI) better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

49%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.S.

said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

56%
of adults with UC surveyed in the U.S.

said they wish they had more time at appointments with their gastroenterologist (GI).

42%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.S.

said their GI rarely has time to address all of their questions/concerns.

45%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.S.

said they often regret not telling their gastroenterologist (GI) more during visits.

40%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.S.

said they worry that if they ask too many questions to their GI, they will be seen as a difficult patient and it will affect their quality of care.

55%
of UC patients surveyed in the U.S.

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

86%
of gastroenterologists (GIs) surveyed in the U.S.

said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

uc-narrative-global-survey-data

Take a deeper look at the UC Narrative Global Survey data with this helpful infographic.

Explore the survey results

From 2017-2018, we surveyed 2,100 UC patients and 1,271 gastroenterologists from 10 different countries. Here is what they had to say about UC and how it correlates to themes, such as colorectal cancer, mental health, and the importance of patient advocacy organizations.

UC and Colorectal Cancer

  • 100%100%
  • 80%80%

  • 60%60%
  • 40%40%
  • 20%20%

21% of UC patients from the Global Survey were not aware that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.*

UC Patient Global Total

72% of GIs from the Global Survey thought that their UC patients understood that uncontrolled inflammation of the colon is a risk factor for colorectal cancer.

Gastroenterologist (GI) Global Total

UC and Conditions Outside the Colon

  • 100%100%
  • 80%80%
  • 60%
    60%
  • 40%40%

  • 20%20%

31% of UC patients from the Global Survey were not aware that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

UC Patient Global Total

66% of GIs from the Global Survey thought that their patients understood that UC may be associated with other conditions outside the colon.*

Gastroenterologist (GI) Global Total

UC and Mental Health

  • 100%100%
  • 80%80%
  • 60%60%

  • 40%40%

  • 20%20%

30% of UC patients from the Global Survey wished that their GI better understood how much UC impacts their mental health.

UC Patient Global Total

51% of GIs from the Global Survey said they never discuss the impact of UC on patients’ mental/emotional health.

Gastroenterologist (GI) Global Total

UC and Advocacy Organizations

  • 100%100%

  • 80%80%

  • 60%60%
  • 40%40%
  • 20%20%

60% of UC patients from the Global Survey said they agreed that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC. *

UC Patient Global Total

84% of GIs from the Global Survey said they agree that patient advocacy organizations are important to the management of UC.*

Gastroenterologist (GI) Global Total


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