UC Basics

EXPLORE UC AND HOW IT MAY IMPACT YOU.

What is ulcerative colitis?

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of the large intestine, which includes the colon. This disease is characterized by the inflammation – irritation or swelling – and sores, also known as ulcers, of the colon and rectum. The symptoms associated with UC may include bloody diarrhea, urgency, and abdominal cramps.

No one knows exactly what causes ulcerative colitis, and it can affect every individual in a different way. UC is a chronic, or ongoing condition, and while there is no cure for this disease, it can be managed.

COMMON ULCERATIVE COLITIS SYMPTOMS.

Ulcerative colitis most often begins gradually, and symptoms tend to come and go. Symptoms can range based on the severity of the disease. The different levels of severity of ulcerative colitis include mild, moderate, and severe.

Most people go through periods of flares – the return of symptoms such as diarrhea, abdominal pain and cramping, and urgent bowel movements – or remission, a time where the symptoms may disappear for a few weeks or even years.

Diarrhea - Drops
DIARRHEA
With inflammation, the colon loses its ability to absorb water, which leads to a progressive loosening of the stool. This is one of the most common symptoms, especially during a flare.
Rectal Bleeding - Drop
RECTAL BLEEDING
Ulceration of the lining of the colon can cause bleeding, which may lead to anemia.
Abdominal Discomfort - Torso
ABDOMINAL DISCOMFORT
As the lining of the intestine becomes inflamed and ulcerated, loose stool or diarrhea may result, as well as crampy abdominal pain.
Weightloss - Scale
WEIGHT LOSS
Some symptoms associated with UC can result in a loss of appetite and subsequent weight loss. Weight loss can become more evident if not addressed.
Fatigue - Battery
FATIGUE
Reduced appetite and weight loss, along with anemia, can lead to a feeling of low energy.
Urgency – Bathroom sign
URGENCY
Along with abdominal pain, most people with UC will experience an urgency to have a bowel movement.
There are different types of UC.

Location, severity, and symptoms can vary.

Managing Ulcerative Colitis

UC affects every person differently.

It’s important to remember there is no cure for ulcerative colitis, but symptoms can be managed. Each person’s UC is different and that’s why it’s important to work with your doctor.

Check out these tips for your next appointment with your doctor. They may help you get the most out of your visit.

WORK WITH YOUR GASTROENTEROLOGIST TO ESTABLISH A COMPREHENSIVE APPROACH TO YOUR UC MANAGEMENT.

There’s no doubt that living with UC is challenging but there are ways to manage it. UC can affect many parts of your life, not just physically. Your approach to managing it must be individual to you and what your immediate needs are.

Your possible multidisciplinary care team may also include:

  • Primary Care Physician
  • IBD Nurse
  • Registered Dietitian
  • Therapist
  • Complementary and Alternative Medicine

As UC can affect other parts of your body, it’s important to keep in mind that talking to your doctor may help you better manage all the symptoms associated with your UC.

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